Spotify: More than Music

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Spotify: More than Music

Some people see Spotify as just another music streaming app, and some refuse to use it because they are avid and loyal Apple Music users. No matter what people’s preferences are, I think it can definitely be classified as one of the major social media sites, ranking up there with Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat.

Spotify has a worldwide following of 71 million paying subscribers, and this app has truly taken the music scene by storm with its unbeatable access to over 40 million songs (and counting). That isn’t what qualifies this app for a top- ranking position in the social media realm, though. Music can reveal a lot about a person: how they’re feeling, what they like to do, how they are on a day- to- day basis, etc. I can personally say I rely on different playlists to get me through different situations. When I’m working out, I need a hardcore rock/ rap weird mix to keep me motivated. On the other hand, when I’m having an off day, I’d much rather listen to some soft and sappy country music. Then, there’s always the pre-game mashup that’s a make or break when it comes to setting the tone for the rest of the night. Spotify allows me to access so many other people’s playlists that fit exactly what I’m looking for, even if I don’t know what it is.

The Georgia Theater is a prime example of a company that uses Spotify to connect bands to listeners, new and old. The workers at the Georgia Theater have existing playlists that are available to stream, but that are also played at the venue. The week before an artist or band is coming to play, they add some of that person’s songs to the playlist, which invites their current listeners to hear either someone they’ve heard before or someone completely new. This tactic then draws in customers to buy tickets for a new band they just recently heard on Spotify. And the cycle repeats.

This use of the Spotify app is something that many people probably wouldn’t have thought about as being social media; however, it is used to bring together people of differing or identical backgrounds and ages through a single commonality. It could be something to think about the next time you put your playlist on public or share your music with others.


2 Comments

Emily Lambert

Emily Lambert

October 4, 2018at 2:21 am

My best friend is actually in charge of creating the Georgia Theater’s Spotify playlist each month!
This post was spot on! Spotify is my favorite social media. I love seeing what my friends are listening to on Spotify. I can automatically tell what kind of mood they’re in or what they’re probably doing based on what they’re listening to. Music is a powerful tool and being able to relate to someone through shared tastes is meaningful. The fact Spotify gives us the entire collection of music ever recorded for $5.99 a month is insane! One feature I love on Spotify is the About tab on an artists page. It shows you the top five cities where the artist is listened to. As I’m deciding on a place to start the next chapter of my life, I take into consideration my favorite artists’ top cities because I feel like their Spotify following is a good indicator for the vibe of the city. Sorry for such a long comment, but this post was just too good!

Nora McGonigle

Nora McGonigle

October 4, 2018at 2:02 pm

Spotify has been very controversial in the music industry the past few years because of the royalties paid to artists. However, I think that Spotify has played an important role in marketing and promoting artists. It’s such an easy way to discover new music, with features like Discovery Weekly, curated playlists, and being able to see what your friends are listening to. It’s also become a place for artists to connect with their fans through creating their own public playlists, and listing tour dates. I think that Spotify is an essential tool for any artist to use, especially up-and-coming artists looking to break into the industry.

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