Fyre Festival Influencers to Blame or Bad Management?

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Fyre Festival Influencers to Blame or Bad Management?

The Fyre Festival disaster was one of the largest scams in recent history and has recently been brought into public view by two separate documentaries on Netflix and Hulu. The music festival organized by Billy Mcfarland and Ja Rule was advertised as a event with gourmet meals, world class musical talent, and luxurious living on Great Exuma Island in the Bahamas. Tickets sold for thousands of dollars mostly in part to the influence of dozens of famous celebrities including Kendall Jenner, Hailey Baldwin, and Bella Hadid. When the festival goers showed up they were in for a terrible surprise. The gourmet meals consisted of cheese sandwiches, the music was played only by local musicians, and the luxurious living was hundreds of small rain drenched tents. The festival was a bust and nothing like the promotional video attached.

Now some of the influencers including Kylie Jenner are being subpoenaed for influencing people to attend the festival. Mcfarland reportedly paid $26,000,000 to influencers, musicians, and brands who helped sponsor the event. Kylie Jenner was reportedly paid $250,000 for one Instagram post promoting the festival. The event didn’t nearly come close to what they had promoted but can you blame influencers for taking money to promote an event that they thought would be a huge success. The problem that most people have with these influencers is that the FTC requires influencers to let there followers know that they were paid to promote, and in this case most of them did not. It is important that they let people know that they have been paid to post so that the customers can take the product or event with a bit of skepticism. At the end of the day Billy Mcfarland took most of the blame, after defrauding investors for the Fyre Festival he was sentenced to six years in federal prison. 

 


2 Comments

Caroline Brown

Caroline Brown

January 28, 2019at 9:28 pm

I think Bad Management is more to blame than the Frye Festival promoters. Most of these promoter’s managers were more in charge of their social media and what they say about an event than they are. I think another thing to comment on is Netflix and Hulu dueling by both having their own version of the film.

Katie Arnold

Katie Arnold

January 29, 2019at 8:36 pm

I actually just watched the documentary after getting texts that I would be interested in it. They were right. First of all the agencies used worked were large New York agencies, I am hesitant to believe that they had no liability clause in their contracts. As for influencers, I believe this was the start of more regulations for them such as having to included the sponsored tag. Something else I was interested in is the content deliema both Netflix and Hulu have gotten themselves in by both creating a documentary on this. Will this overlap continue in the future? Only time will tell.

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